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Posts Tagged ‘Putting up Nest Boxes’

The RSPB has launched the results of their 2016 Big Garden Birdwatch, during which a staggering 8,262,662 birds were counted, the top ten birds were:

  1. House Sparrow
  2. Starling
  3. Blue Tit
  4. Blackbird
  5. Woodpigeon
  6. Goldfinch
  7. Chaffinch
  8. Great Tit
  9. Robin
  10. Long-Tailed Tit

The House Sparrow remained at number one, around 4 House Sparrows were spotted in each garden, the Blackbird was the most widespread garden bird appearing in 88% of gardens, the Long-Tailed Tit was a new entry in tenth place, the RSPB commented that ‘January’s mild weather meant more smaller birds had survived the winter, and although natural food sources were plentiful, it’s clear these birds still rely on the food we put out in our gardens’.

We were fortunate to spend the Easter Weekend at Silverdale, whenever we go on holiday we always do our own Bird Species Count, the Silverdale area is ideal for birds with mixed habitats including, woodland, meadows, reedbeds, freshwater pools and on the coast saltwater lagoons and mud flats, we counted 67 different species in total which was amazing despite the mixed weather.

One of the highlights was seeing the first Sand Martin of the year, Sand Martins are just one of over 50 species of Summer migrants that come to our shores every year to breed, others include Swallows, House Martins, Swifts, Wheatear, Chiffchaff, Willow Warblers, Blackcap, Yellow Wagtail, Cuckoo and Spotted and Pied Flycatcher, they are lured back by the warm spring weather, longer days and our insects! Millions of birds visit each year usually arriving on the south coast first, then moving northwards, they have flown thousands of miles from as far away as Africa where they spent the Winter, and will return there in Autumn with their young.

During the Easter holidays if you want to help the birds in your garden why not:

Put out some bird feeders and a bird bath/water dish – different types of feeders and food will attract a wider range of species, birds need a source of fresh water to drink and to bathe in to keep their feathers in tip top condition.

Square Ground Bird Table

Square Ground Bird Table

Wildlife World Coniston Bird Bath

Coniston Bird Bath

Put up some nest boxes around your garden – nest boxes come in varying sizes and styles to suit different species of birds, put up a selection of boxes to encourage birds to nest in your garden.

CJ Wildlife Robin & Wren Nest Box

Robin & Wren Nest Box

CJ Wildlife House Martin Nest Box - Double Chamber

Double House Martin Nest Box

Finally, relax, watch and record the different species of birds that you see in your garden, on the park, during a walk, day out or on holiday – keep an eye out for our Summer migrants.

Have fun.

Gill

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As I sat at my computer on Tuesday I was greeted by a lovely illustration on the Google page of a group of trees, their leaves turned golden brown and dropped to the ground this was to mark the first day of Autumn (23 September), it is funny that after all the beautiful, warm, sunny and dry weather we have had the weather changed on Tuesday it was definitely Autumnal the temperatures had dropped and it rained needless to say the central heating went on that evening for the first time in many months.

Autumn Leaf Mix

Spectacular Autumn Leaves

What is the Autumn Equinox and who/what decides when it is going to happen?

The Equinox occurs twice a year The Spring Equinox around 20th March and the Autumn Equinox around 22nd September the exact dates and times change every year. The word Equinox comes from the Latin words ‘aequus’ meaning equal and ‘nox’ meaning night, as they occur on the days when the days/nights are approximately equal in length, for us in the Northern hemisphere the sun will continue to rise later and set earlier giving us the shorter days and longer nights of Autumn whilst in the Southern Hemisphere (e.g. Australia) Spring is on its way.

The Autumn and Spring Equinoxes are actually Astrological events, Autumn occurs when the sun passes the equator moving from the northern to the southern hemisphere and the North Pole begins to tilt away from the Sun, Spring occurs when the sun passes the equator moving from the southern to the northern hemisphere and the North Pole begins to lean towards the sun again, anyone that lives in the South Pole will now be seeing the sun for the first time in half a year, whilst those that live in the North Pole will be preparing for six months of darkness.

How does the Autumn Equinox affect people, animals and plants?

Harvest time and the Harvest Festival traditionally falls around the Autumn Equinox when we celebrate, gather and store our crops; the shortening days prompt our wildlife too to store food and to fatten up on Autumn’s abundant fruit, nuts and seeds to see them through the winter months. As the weather turns cooler we put the heating on, wear warmer clothing and extra layers, animals prepare for the cold by growing thick winter coats, many species of birds migrate to warmer climates, the ones that remain grow extra feathers during late Autumn to give them more protection during Winter. Much of our wildlife will be looking for a warm and safe place to shelter or hibernate, now is an ideal time to install some homes for the creatures in your garden, such as Bee, Butterfly and Insect houses, Bird boxes, Hedgehog houses, Bat boxes and Frog and Toad houses.

Hedgehog Igloo House

The cosy Hedgehog Igloo House

Click on the links below for more information on:

Putting up Bird Boxes in your garden or Looking after garden wildlife during the winter.

Trees and plants prepare for winter, leaves change colour and drop off, plant stems die back, then they become dormant, living off the food that they have stored during the summer until the longer and warmer days of Spring return.

So put on an extra layer and see if you can spot any signs of Autumn

Gill

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This year between 14th – 21st February it is National Nest Box Week, this event is organised by the BTO to encourage people to put up nest boxes in their gardens schools, or local green spaces. It was launched in 1997 because birds natural nest sites were disappearing, as trees were being cut down, old houses were being repaired and gardens were being ‘tidied’. Since then it is estimated that between 5 – 6 million nest boxes have been put up by nature lovers across the U.K. By putting up nest boxes now you are giving the birds a chance to become familiar with them before the breeding season starts and also give them a safe place to roost at night.

There are different types of nest boxes available small or large boxes with holes, open fronted nest boxes, very large nest boxes, and community nest boxes each can attract different species of birds, so don’t just put up one box why not spoil the birds and put up a few different types.

If you are a serious bird watcher or a keen enthusiast the addition of a Wildlife Camera in your nest box would be invaluable, you can watch the birds from nest building to the young fledging, and in the comfort of your home.

To get the most out of your nest box, take part in Nest Box Challenge and help the BTO to monitor the breeding success of birds in Britain’s green spaces. To take part, simply register your nest box online and then give them regular updates on whether it is used, what birds are using it, and the progress of any nests.

Remember that any time of the year is a good time to put up a Nest Box.

As this event starts on Valentines Day and if you love birds why not treat them to a nest box or two!

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