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Posts Tagged ‘outdoor nature activities’

School walk 1

I love being outdoors, there is nothing better than going for a walk, it is a great way to relax and get fit whilst being surrounded by birds, animals, insects, flowers, trees and the varied and unique landscapes that make up our fantastic countryside, it really makes you appreciate how wonderful nature is.

Next week is National Countryside Week this is an annual awareness campaign by the Princes Countryside Fund (who give grants to projects that help support the people who care for the countryside) to celebrate the British countryside and the people who live and work in our rural areas, they are encouraging everyone to get together with their family, friends or colleagues and take a walk in the countryside between Mon 14th – Sunday 20th July.

School Walk 2

If you go on a walk be prepared and plan ahead, check the weather forecast and take appropriate footwear, clothing and accessories, bring food, plenty of drinks and a first aid kit, if you are exploring somewhere new take a map, mobile phones are wonderful but only if you can get a signal and most of all don’t forget to follow

The Countryside Code

Respect   –  Protect  –  Enjoy

Respect other people

  • Consider the local community and other people enjoying the outdoors
  • Leave gates and property as you find them and follow paths unless wider access is available

Protect the natural environment

  • Leave no trace of your visit and take your litter home
  • Keep dogs under effective control

Enjoy the outdoors

  • Plan ahead and be prepared
  • Follow advice and local signs

You may see some of these signs on your walk, do you know what they mean?

FootpathFootpath – open to walkers only, waymarked with a yellow arrow.

 

 

 

BridlewayBridleway – open to walkers, horse-riders and cyclists, waymarked with a blue arrow.

 

 

Restricted bywayRestricted byway – open to walkers, cyclists, horse-riders and horse-drawn vehicles, waymarked with a plum coloured arrow.

 

 

Byway open to all trafficByway Open to All Traffic (BOAT) – open to walkers, cyclists, horse-riders, horse-drawn vehicles and motor vehicles, waymarked with a red arrow.

 

National Trail acornNational Trail Acorn – identifies 15 long distance routes in England and Wales. All are open for walking and some trails are also suitable for cyclists, horse-riders and people with limited mobility.

 

The most important thing is to get out there and have fun you don’t need to walk for miles, a walk around your local park can be just as enjoyable, remember to take your camera or your binoculars you never know what you may see.

Mucky Wellies

Happy Walking

Gill

 

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Twigs are useful, fun, free, and help wildlife too.

This Half Term why not put on your warm coat and wellies and go for a walk in the woods or the park and find some sticks, after all this windy weather there should be plenty lying on the ground, collect different lengths and thicknesses, you may also find some on the beach which have been washed up by the sea often in interesting shapes and colours.

Here are a few suggestions for your bounty of sticks:

Pooh Sticks

This game was played and made famous by Winnie the Pooh, you can play it on any bridge over running water, each person drops a stick (at the same time) from the bridge on the upstream side then peers (carefully) over the downside of the bridge to see whose stick appears first, this is the winning stick.

Did you know that there is a World Pooh Sticks Championship, this year it is on Sunday 30th March at Day’s Lock, Little Wittenham, Oxfordshire it is a charity event organised by the Rotary Club of Oxford Spires and Friends.

Tracking Sticks

Tracking with Sticks

Tracking with sticks is a popular Scouting activity; you can play it in the park (split your participants into two groups), in the back garden or even in the house. Use your sticks to leave a trail of arrows to give clues to your seekers of your whereabouts they can be in the open or can be slightly hidden to make it harder.

Spider Catcher 2

Make a Spiders Web Catcher

Spiders are opportunists and will make their web wherever there is the chance of catching some insects. Choose three straightish sticks about 30cm long, place them on the floor in a triangle and tie each corner tightly with string, next pick a strong thickish stick about 80cm in length and tie your stick triangle to it at one end. Push your stick into the ground near some bushes and wait patiently, it may take a while before a spider makes its web there.

Build an Insect/Bug home

When you have finished with your sticks return them to nature and make a home for Insects, Bugs and Beetles. Find a nice quiet corner of your garden, break your sticks so that they are roughly all the same size and then lay them all the same way on top of each other, you can put some leaves, soil and grass in between this will make a damp environment for your creatures, finish off by putting some more leaves and foliage on top.

Have a great holiday and have fun!

Gill

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