Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘gardening for bees’

 

Spring Plants – Pussy Willow, Apple/Crab Apple Trees, Lungwort, Crocus, Redcurrant, Kale

Late Spring Plants – Cotoneaster, Hawthorn, Comfrey, Phacelia, Chives, Strawberry

Summer Plants – Lavender, Honeysuckle, Monarda ‘Bee balm’, Foxglove, Sunflower, Runner/Broad Bean, Sage

Autumn Plants – Abelia ‘Bee bush’, Strawberry Tree, Sedum, Perennial Wallflower, Marjoram, Raspberry

Winter Plants – Mahonia, Ivy, Winter Aconite, Snowdrop

For more information and ideas how to help Bees in our gardens and our communities click here.

Bumble Bee

Bees play a huge part in our lives, much of the food that we eat, the plants and flowers that we love and the crops that we grow wouldn’t be possible without them. There are around 250 species of Bee in the UK which include 24 species of Bumblebees, around 225 species of Solitary Bees and one species of Honeybee. Bumblebees are easy to identify as they are usually larger and covered with dense hair but do you know which species it is? Identifying Solitary Bees is even trickier with a choice of 225 species, help is at hand – download the FREE Great British Bee Count App this will enable you to identify the Bees that you see and submit your sightings.

Last year over 100,000 individual sightings of Bees were submitted, this year an amazing 18,200 have been recorded already, it is a great way to learn how to recognise our British Bees as well as the different species that we have, so join the Great British Bee Count, download the App today and get outdoors: at home, at School, in the park or on a walk and get spotting.

Have fun

Gill

Read Full Post »

Working together, 25 wildlife organisations have taken a very close look at our native wildlife and on 22 May 2013 published ‘The State of Nature report’. This report has alarmingly revealed that 60% of the species studied have declined with more than 1 in 10 under threat of disappearing. The decline in many of these species can be reversed by providing a clean habitat, good food and a healthy environment so that they can breed and their young survive.

Communities, Schools and individuals really can make a diference, last week the RSPB launched the ‘Giving Nature a Home’ campaign to encourage people to create habit, homes and a safe haven for their wildlife. There are many ways that you can do this here are a few suggestions.

The Hogitat Hedgehog House

The Hogitat Hedgehog House

–   Put a hedgehog house in a quiet area of your garden

–   Build a pond

Frogitat - Ceramic Frog and Toad House

Frogitat – Ceramic Frog and Toad House

–   Provide a home for frogs and toads

–   Let a corner of your garden go wild

–   Create a dead wood pile for insects

 Wooden Bat Box

–   Put up some bat boxes

–   Feed the birds regularly, provide fresh water and nest boxes

–   Plant a tree or shrub

Attractor Pack - Bumble Bees

–   Grow nectar rich flowers that benefit bees and insects

Solitary Bee Hive

–   Put up bee and insect houses

I am very passionate about wildlife, in our garden we have: a large pond which is home to many species, nestboxes (most of them occupied) on all 3 sides of the house, a bee house, hedgehog house and in the very near future I will be putting up some insect houses.

Why not take a look at your garden and see if you can make it a haven for wildlife too.

Gill

Read Full Post »

 We love this Bee-Kind advice from Friends of the Earth so we thought we would share it with you.

The Friendly bumble bee is in decline all over Europe.  This is bad news as they pollinate a wide variety of the plants we eat.

 

Bumble bees often nest in compost heaps, so if you see some emerging from yours try to leave them in peace as much as possible – they sting only when provoked and die off naturally in autumn.

If you would like to receive regular top tips from Friends of the Earth on how to have a greener way of life, you will find all the information here.

Read Full Post »