Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘bird feeders’

I hope that you have all had a lovely Easter. Over the holidays we managed to get away in the caravan to Silverdale and had a great time although it was a little bit chilly but the cold weather didn’t seem to put off the wildlife.

The Adventurer Feeder

When we go on holiday we always take with us a couple of Bird Feeders (one for Seed or Sunflower Hearts and one for Peanuts) to put up near the caravan. This is something that anyone could do and you can often attract different species that you wouldn’t get in your garden. Within half an hour we had Blue Tits, Coal Tits, Great Tits, and Robins and were thrilled when a couple of Marsh Tits and Jays arrived later on.

A hungry Pheasant

The fallen seeds on the ground attracted Blackbirds, Jackdaws, Magpies and Pheasants, it was not just the birds that were hungry, Grey Squirrels were regular visitors and their acrobatics were very funny to watch but they did tend to monopolise the feeders, and had started to chew them, we shall have to invest in some Squirrel Proof Bird Feeders for our next holiday.

Whether you are at home or on holiday keep feeding the birds, they need your help throughout the year not just during winter.

Small Guardian Seed Feeder

On one of our woodland walks we were privileged to see a couple of Roe Deer (a female and her year old fawn) later we came across a lovely sunny bank carpeted with our native Bluebell, they were stunning and their sweet perfume was delightful. If you get the opportunity go for a walk in your local woods and witness this spectacular sight, as well doing a bit of bird/wildlife spotting (take your Nature Diary with you). You can find out where your nearest Bluebell Wood is by visiting The Woodlands Trust website, here you can also register your local Bluebell Wood so that other people may visit it too.

A stunning Bluebell Wood

So get out there and enjoy your environment.

Gill

Read Full Post »

It is very important that we all feed the birds especially at the moment during this cold snap although the weather this winter has been relatively mild so far. Your supply of food can save the lives of many birds. A survey last month revealed that 59% of people rarely or never feed the birds in the winter months. Many birds including the Blue Tit which only weighs one third of an ounce needs to eat 40% of their bodyweight just to stay alive in cold weather and they rely on us putting out food. It is vital to provide food on a daily basis as much of the birds energy can be used up searching for food.

Take a look at our great range of Bird Food and Bird Feeders they are all ideal for your garden birds.

Hygiene is very important so before you fill up your bird feeders it is a good idea to check if any remaining food has gone bad, if so this should be thrown away and the feeders given a good wash, I checked mine this week and found that this was the case, I think that during the mild and wet Christmas period the birds were not eating as much and so the food had started to go black and mouldy. You will also need to clean bird tables regularly as bird droppings can transmit disease especially if they are mixed with food and also discard any mouldy food left on the bird table.

A birdtable makes a useful and attractive feature

It is equally important to provide clean water for the birds both for drinking and also bathing this is essential to keep feathers in good condition, bird droppings can also accumulate in Bird Baths too and so these will need to be washed out regularly. During cold weather check that they have not frozen up, the addition of a tennis ball will help to prevent this.

Hanging Water Dish

Read Full Post »

Nesting places are limited in many gardens, and to maximise the number and variety of birds you have in your local area, consider putting up some nest boxes.  …And the nesting season is starting to get into full swing so get them installed as soon as you can!

 

Which Nest Box to Choose

The robin and wren prefers to nest in an open fronted box, and our Robin and Wren Nest Box has been specifically designed with this in mind. 

 

Equally suitable is the Open Birch Log Nest Box and is perfect if you prefer a more natural look. 

These nest boxes should be located low to the ground, no more than 1m or so high, and will need to be well hidden by vegetation to keep predators away. 

House Sparrow were once one of our commonest birds but populations have sharply declined in recent years, partly due to a lack of natural nesting sites. 

House sparrows are very communal birds, typically nesting in colonies, so the  Timber House Sparrow Terrace is perfect for them. 

Inside the box is split into chambers to fit three pairs of birds – all very cosy!  House sparrows are happy to use a nest box positioned high under the eaves, but when locating it remember to keep away from areas where house martins or swifts usually nest.

The Birch Log Hole Nest Box  is suitable for tits and sparrows, and should be fixed at a height of between 2 and 4 metres.

Siting Your Nestbox

Birds like to have a clear flight path to the nest box so avoid too many obstacles that can make access difficult.  It’s also a good idea to tilt the bird box downwards a little bit, then when it rains, the rain is more likely to hit the roof and not enter the nest box itself.

The nest box is best located away from strong, direct sunlight and strong winds, so unless it is in a sheltered corner position it so it is facing a north-easterly direction where possible.

Cleaning Your Nestboxes

Nestboxes should be cleaned well before the nesting season begins.  Old nests can harbour disease and parasites so should be removed.  Boiling water can be used to kill any remaining bugs and the box should then be left to dry out thoroughly before putting up in the garden.

The RSBP recommend that nestboxes should not inspected whilst birds are nesting, how ever tempting this might be.  But you can keep an eye on everything that’s going on inside with the Nestbox with Infra Red Camera.  Live footage taken during the day and night can then be viewed from your television! 

…And to give birds a helping hand during the busy nesting season, don’t forget to provide water in a Bird Bath and some supplementary Bird Food on a Garden Bird Table.

Read Full Post »

Here at Gardening With Children, we care deeply about our environment as well as our wildlife, and during the winter months I have had such fun with my own children watching the birds in our garden.  

Try Gourmet Robin Food in your garden and give this favourite bird a real treat

The children’s sheer delight as the drama of the bird world unfolds…  The blue tits and great tits swapping and changing on the nut feeders, the blackbirds exploring the ground, the cautious wren hopping amongst the flower pots and the swooping in of the starlings – a boisterous mob of tear aways coming in and causing chaos… and that’s all in a few minutes!  

The Niyger Bird Feeder is great for all sorts of seed feeding birds

 …And yesterday I shared a joke with Jemima as we watched a pied wagtail perched on the wall.  As it teetered and bobbed, wagging its tail to keep balance we soon saw where it got it’s name!! 

Birds need our help more than ever at this time of year and we have also been feeding the birds at school.  This provides a fantastic learning experience for the children, and handy feeders such as the Discovery Seed Feeder and the Window Bird Feeder can be placed where the children can see so much of the action from inside the classroom. 

 

We also love the Handing Bird Table  and the Ground Bird Table.  Both are priced at just £13.95 and are made from FSC wood.  Bird tables are important in any garden.  They reduce the risk of hygiene problems, can be easily cleaned and they keep pets out of reach.  They are also perfect for gardens where space is limited. 

 

The full range of wildlife products, from for Hedgehog Food to Peanut Cakes and beautiful Birch Nesting Boxes, are all available at www.recycleworks.co.uk

 

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts