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Posts Tagged ‘bird feeder’

We think you will like this delightful and beautifully made porcelain Blue Tit Feeding House, decorated with Blue Tit illustrations by Marjolein Bastin. 

The perfect present for anyone who enjoys attracting birds to their garden, it is ideal for small gardens and balconies and can be easily hung against a wall, tree or fence post.

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Nesting places are limited in many gardens, and to maximise the number and variety of birds you have in your local area, consider putting up some nest boxes.  …And the nesting season is starting to get into full swing so get them installed as soon as you can!

 

Which Nest Box to Choose

The robin and wren prefers to nest in an open fronted box, and our Robin and Wren Nest Box has been specifically designed with this in mind. 

 

Equally suitable is the Open Birch Log Nest Box and is perfect if you prefer a more natural look. 

These nest boxes should be located low to the ground, no more than 1m or so high, and will need to be well hidden by vegetation to keep predators away. 

House Sparrow were once one of our commonest birds but populations have sharply declined in recent years, partly due to a lack of natural nesting sites. 

House sparrows are very communal birds, typically nesting in colonies, so the  Timber House Sparrow Terrace is perfect for them. 

Inside the box is split into chambers to fit three pairs of birds – all very cosy!  House sparrows are happy to use a nest box positioned high under the eaves, but when locating it remember to keep away from areas where house martins or swifts usually nest.

The Birch Log Hole Nest Box  is suitable for tits and sparrows, and should be fixed at a height of between 2 and 4 metres.

Siting Your Nestbox

Birds like to have a clear flight path to the nest box so avoid too many obstacles that can make access difficult.  It’s also a good idea to tilt the bird box downwards a little bit, then when it rains, the rain is more likely to hit the roof and not enter the nest box itself.

The nest box is best located away from strong, direct sunlight and strong winds, so unless it is in a sheltered corner position it so it is facing a north-easterly direction where possible.

Cleaning Your Nestboxes

Nestboxes should be cleaned well before the nesting season begins.  Old nests can harbour disease and parasites so should be removed.  Boiling water can be used to kill any remaining bugs and the box should then be left to dry out thoroughly before putting up in the garden.

The RSBP recommend that nestboxes should not inspected whilst birds are nesting, how ever tempting this might be.  But you can keep an eye on everything that’s going on inside with the Nestbox with Infra Red Camera.  Live footage taken during the day and night can then be viewed from your television! 

…And to give birds a helping hand during the busy nesting season, don’t forget to provide water in a Bird Bath and some supplementary Bird Food on a Garden Bird Table.

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