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Archive for December, 2011

Christmas is a time when we often spend more on food, and as family budgets get a little stretched it’s even more important to get the most out of our food. 

For peelings and left-overs that can’t be reused take a look at the Bokashi Bucket system

Every time you have scraps to throw, be it meat fish or vegetable, just open the lid and drop them in the Bokashi Bucket along with a ‘sprinkling’ of the Bokashi Bran and re-seal the lid.

When the bucket is full, leave for two weeks with the lid sealed and then either dig the resultant Bokashi into the garden or add to your compost heap. As the Bokashi is ‘composting’ in the Bokashi bucket, a nutient rich liquor is produced which is collected by using the tap on the bucket every couple of days. Dilute the liquor with water at 1:100 and use as plant feed throughout the home and garden.

To make the most of food that can still be eaten take a look at Love Food Hate Waste.  They shares top tips to help you cut food waste, save some money, and make the cook’s life a little easier.

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The children will have lots of fun making these home-made christmas cards over the festive season.  Home-made means so much more, and with some bright colours, silver foil and glitter they can get very creative with their designs!

Click here to print off their favourite pictures.  Then, with adult help, cut along the dotted line and fold along the solid lines.  The kids can then decorate the cards and sign their name inside!

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This very clever, game makes putting up the real Christmas tree lights seem like a piece of cake! 
My children had lots of fun trying to turn on the lights.
How will you do?  Click here to take a turn

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We love these kids Minibug houses, and they are are a great way to introduce children to the facinating world of wildlife.

Perfectly designed for children to use, the bug habitats have also been carefully constructed to provide perfect insect habitats too.

The MiniBug Ladybird Log is a natural habitat for ladybirds and other beneficial insects.  Constructed from solid FSC birch logs and oak, larch, or similar timber for durability, the Ladybird Log has a hollow central chamber that can be filled with natural material to provide insulation and security for the ladybirds inside. 

Intersecting the chamber are many holes drilled into the log at an upward angle, which allow the insects to reach the insulated and safe inner chamber. Ladybird Food/Attractant can be used with the tower if necessary and/or the tower may be used to release larvae with food source.

 

This Minibugs Bug Box  provides over-wintering habitats for insects such as solitary bees (non-aggressive garden pollinators).

Offering a variety of potential habitats, the top section is made of variable sized canes and the lower of bored solid timber.

 

 

The MiniBug Solitary Bee House is a natural habitat for non-swarming solitary bees.

Based upon the best selling solitary beehive and made from naturally durable FSC Cedar, this unique solitary bee house is specifically designed to attract non-swarming bees, which are gregarious and safe around children and pets.

 The bees are naturally attracted to holes in wood and the MiniBug Solitary Beehive provides habitat that has become harder to find in modern gardens

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Well we don’t have any snow outside yet so why not Build Your Own Snowman with this fun game.  It is great for children from 4 years upwards. 

Simply create your own personalised snowman, give him a name and print your picture out to keep!

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With Christmas not far away now, the Recycleworks has a great range of wildlife cameras, which are a brilliant gift idea. 

Perfect for getting great close-up views of all sorts of wildlife, you can choose a camera to watch nest box and bat box activity, visitors to the hedgehog house or feeding at the bird table. 

There is something to suit every enthusiastic wildlife watcher.  Click here for all the details. 

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